Search Results

To view an individual record, click number in first column.

First   |   Prev   |   Record 1 - 25 of 13239   |   Next   |   Last      
Restore Original Sort Order Accession  number Family Genus Species variety Range Location Common  Name SourceMiscellaneous Filemaker  Accession AccessionStatus SourceNumber Collector Author Source RecordReferenceNumber Photo::Photo1 Photo::Photo2
1 species SLB  Greenhouse Silverback  fern Source:  Found  growing  as  weeds  at  the  Conservatory.    Will  continue  to  re-propagate  this  plant  from  sporlings.
Miscellaneous: 
F2010.13198 Present Doug  Walker Doug Found  growing  as  weeds  at  the  Conservatory.    Will  continue  to  re-propagate  this  plant  from  sporlings.
2 species SLB  Greenhouse Fern  gametophyte Source:  Any  fern.
Miscellaneous:  Will  any  species  work?
F2010.13203 Doug Any  fern.
3 species Burpee  Bush  Queen Squash F2010.13276 Present Doug  Walker Doug
4 species Burpee  Butterbush  Squash Squash Source:  Burpee  Seed  Company
Miscellaneous: 
F2010.13272 Present Doug  Walker Doug Burpee  Seed  Company
5 species Early  Yellow  Crookneck Squash Source:  Lake  Valley  Seed
Miscellaneous:  Takes  much  longer  for  first  female  flower  to  open  than  “Gold  Rush  Hybird”.    This  measured  in  SLB  Greenhouse  in  Winter  2010.
Followup  note:  “Early  Yellow  Crookneck”  is  successfully  pollinated  and  has  many  normal  size  fruit.    It  took  57  days  from  seed  to  fruit  in  SLB  Greenhouse  in  Winter.    Will  not  use  “Gold  Rush  Hybrid”  for  class  because  we  could  not  successfully  pollinate  it.
F2010.13201 Present Doug  Walker Doug Lake  Valley  Seed
6 species Gold  Rush  Hybrid Squash Source:  Lake  Valley  Seed
Miscellaneous:  Produces  female  flowers  very  early  unlike  “Early  Yellow  Crookneck”.    It  took  32  days  for  the  first  female  flower  to  open.  This  measured  in  SLB  Greenhouse  in  Winter  2010.
Followup  note:    Almost  no  success  with  pollination.    But  “Early  Yellow  Crookneck”  is  successfully  pollinated  and  has  many  normal  size  fruit.    Will  not  use  “Gold  Rush  Hybrid”  for  class.
F2010.13200 Present Doug  Walker Doug Lake  Valley  Seed
7 B2010.061 Amborella trichopoda Source:  UC  Boulder,  Tom  Lemieux
Miscellaneous:  Both  cuttings  are  male.
Both  cuttings  rooted  well  and  survived.
F2011.13322 Unavailable Tim  Metcalf Doug UC  Boulder,  Tom  Lemieux
8 Ananas comosus Del  Monte  Gold Pineapple Source:  Nugget  Grocery  Store.    Grown  in  Costa  Rica.
Miscellaneous:  Need  plant  with  fruit  for  BIS  2B.
F2009.5351 Doug  Walker Doug Nugget  Grocery  Store.    Grown  in  Costa  Rica.
9 Antirrhinum species Oriental  Lanterns Snapdragon Source:  Park  Seed  Co.
Miscellaneous:  The  smallest  Snap  yet!
If  there  is  a  more  adorable  Snap,  we  haven't  seen  it!  Oriental  Lanterns™  is  the  most  petite  yet,  just  8  inches  high,  about  4  inches  wide,  and  packed  with  glowing  garnet  and  gold  tones.  It  may  remind  you  of  a  smaller  version  of  Candy  Corn,  but  this  little  powerhouse  far  outlasts  most  other  Snaps  twice  its  size,  holding  up  well  in  the  autumn  landscape.
The  blooms  appear  above  fresh  green  foliage,  stacked  tightly  along  sturdy  stems.  Great  for  cutting,  they  are  such  a  charming  sight  in  the  garden  that  passersby  will  have  to  pause  to  admire  their  beauty.  We  advise  growing  two  patches:  one  for  the  cutting  garden,  another  in  the  sunny  bed,  foundation,  or  border!

Oriental  Lanterns™  loves  full  sun  and  well-drained  soil  enriched  with  organics.  Plant  it  to  face  down  taller  Snaps  or  to  combine  with  Pansies,  ornamental  cabbage,  and  other  fall  annuals.  Such  bright  color  is  hard  to  find!  Pkt  is  100  seeds.
F2011.13299 Present Doug  Walker Doug Park  Seed  Co.
10 Asclepias curassavica SLB  Greenhouse Source:  This  is  one  of  those  plants  we  have  had  for  many  years.    It  has  been  propagated  by  cuttings  and  seed  from  itself.
Miscellaneous:  Can  be  propagated  by  cuttings  and  have  flowers  in  6  -  8  weeks.
F.5295 Present Unknown Doug This  is  one  of  those  plants  we  have  had  for  many  years.    It  has  been  propagated  by  cuttings  and  seed  from  itself.
11 Astrophytum asterias Source:  Tim  Devine.
Miscellaneous: 
F2009.5298 Doug Tim  Devine.
12 Azolla ? GH-61  Outside  East  pond,  Weier  greenhouse Source:  Its  the  one  we  have  had  for  years  at  Weier  and  the  outside  pond.
Miscellaneous: 
F.5282 Administrator Its  the  one  we  have  had  for  years  at  Weier  and  the  outside  pond.
13 Coleus blumeri Coleus Source:  These  have  always  been  with  us.    They  initially  were  at  OP,  then  Weier  GH,  and  are  now  at  SLB  GH.
Miscellaneous:  Need  to  have  a  minimum  of  six  (eight  to  be  safe)  plants  for  classes.
F.5285 Present Doug These  have  always  been  with  us.    They  initially  were  at  OP,  then  Weier  GH,  and  are  now  at  SLB  GH.
14 Ecballium ? F.5286 Doug
15 Echinacea purpurea Sundown™  PP#17,659 Coneflower Source:  Park  Seed  Co.
Miscellaneous:  The  Big  Orange  Blooms  that  Just  Won't  Quit!
Deer  resistant  and  ready  to  flower  for  months!
Plant  Patent  #17,659.  Cultivar  name:  'Evan  Saul.'  You  will  love  this  big-flowered,  beautiful  orange  Coneflower.  It's  an  exciting  new  plant  because  the  color  is  highly  unusual  for  Echinacea  and  the  flower  power  is  just  extraordinary,  but  I  predict  that  you  will  fall  in  love  with  the  blooms  themselves,  both  in  the  garden  and  in  the  vase.  Few  plants  are  more  floriferous  over  a  longer  season  than  Coneflower,  and  Sundown™  is  a  feast  for  the  senses!
The  3  1/2-inch  blooms  begin  in  early  summer  and  continue  well  into  fall,  held  on  super-strong  stems  that  last  a  week  or  more  in  the  vase.  These  flowers  have  long,  crowded  petals  of  golden-orange  held  straight  out  around  a  giant  central  brown  cone.  In  late  fall,  when  the  petals  have  dropped,  this  cone  becomes  an  important  part  of  your  garden.  It's  full  of  seeds  that  dry  during  the  cool  autumn  weather,  and  songbirds  arrive  to  feast  on  them  in  great  numbers!  (Get  your  camera  ready.)

Older  Coneflowers  tend  to  be  long  on  foliage  and  short  on  blooms,  but  Sundown™  is  quite  well-branched  and  compact.  It's  a  cross  of  two  Echinacea  species  --  E.  paradoxa  and  E.  purpurea,  which  gives  it  broader  petals,  more  vigorous  growth,  and  better  branching.  It  reaches  up  to  3  feet  high  and  spreads  up  to  2  feet  wide,  but  you  will  find  it  covered  with  blooms  for  months  on  end.  This  is  a  "cut-and-come-again"  variety,  so  the  faster  you  cut  or  deadhead  the  flowers,  the  quicker  new  buds  spring  up  to  take  their  place.  But  it's  also  a  fine  plant  for  an  open  or  natural  setting,  and  repays  neglect  with  season  after  season  of  blooms!

If  you  like  Coneflowers,  you're  in  for  a  treat.  We've  got  a  lovely  big-flowered  yellow  variety,  plus  a  compact  fragrant  magenta  that  is  really  stunning  alongside  Sundown™!  If  you've  got  a  hot,  sunny,  slightly  dry  garden  spot,  Coneflower  is  exactly  what  you  need  to  fill  it!  Enjoy  this  carefree  perennial.  Zones  4-9.

F2011.13298 Present Doug  Walker Doug Park  Seed  Co.
16 Echinocactus texensis Horse  crippler Source:  From  GH-116N  Plant  Faire.    There  were  no  labels.    I  brought  these  to  SLB  GH.
Miscellaneous: 
F2009.5359 Doug From  GH-116N  Plant  Faire.    There  were  no  labels.    I  brought  these  to  SLB  GH.
17 Euphorbia obesa Baseball  plant Source:  Tim  Devine.      He  grew  these  from  seed  he  collected  from  his  plants  at  Cal  State  Chico.
Miscellaneous: 
F2009.5297 Doug Tim  Devine.      He  grew  these  from  seed  he  collected  from  his  plants  at  Cal  State  Chico.
18 BAB.607 Lycopodium species Source: 
Miscellaneous:  This  is  the  one  that  cones  a  lot.    Ernesto  was  uncertain  of  its  accession  number  or  source.    Hence  he  gave  it  a  new  number.
F2011.13297 Present Doug
19 Mimosa pudica Source:  Stokes  Seed  Company
Miscellaneous: 
F.5293 Doug Stokes  Seed  Company
20 Orbea wissmannii Source:  Mesa  Garden.    She  purchased  it  a  young  plant.
Miscellaneous:  Traded  for  Welwitschia  at  AERGC.
F2011.13309 Present Lynn  Janik Doug Mesa  Garden.    She  purchased  it  a  young  plant.
21 Phalaenopsis X Brother  Lawrence Source:  Orchids  by  Hauserman.
Hauserman  code:  Z-17638
Miscellaneous: 
F2010.13268 Present Doug  Walker Doug Orchids  by  Hauserman.
Hauserman  code:  Z-17638
22 Phalaenopsis X Candy  Stripe Source:  Orchids  by  Hauserman.
Hauseman  code:  PH-2
Miscellaneous: 
F2010.13265 Present Doug  Walker Doug Orchids  by  Hauserman.
Hauseman  code:  PH-2
23 Phalaenopsis X Marisela  Arias  x  Valiant  One Source:  Orchids  by  Hauserman.
Hauserman  code:  Z-18165
Miscellaneous: 
F2010.13266 Present Doug  Walker Doug Orchids  by  Hauserman.
Hauserman  code:  Z-18165
24 Phaseolus vulgaris Cal  Early  Light Red  Kidney  Bean Source:  UCD  Foundation  Seed  Program
Miscellaneous:  Cert#  08CA-807-3828
Lot#  08-30
F2009.5288 UCD  Foundation  Seed Doug UCD  Foundation  Seed  Program
25 Pilea ? F.5287 Doug